October 17, 2012

Walther's Law and Gospel lectures 24, 25, 26

A couple of great Walther lectures I read over the last few days.

Lecture 24 exposes Melancthon for the Synergist he was:
http://www.lutherantheology.com/uploads/works/walther/LG/lecture-24.html

Lecture 25 speaks passionately about the NECESSITY of pastors who will not just preach truth but will plainly and accurately and VIGOROUSLY refute error from the pulpit, which some in the AFLC, our current denomination, sadly do not want to do:
http://www.lutherantheology.com/uploads/works/walther/LG/lecture-25.html

In fact I once got an email back from the dean of the seminary defending the unwillingness to thoroughly do the job of a pastor/teacher. I had asked the dean if they planned on doing anything to warn about the error of the Church Growth movement and adoption of Purpose Driven or Seeker sensitive methodologies. I was told by the Seminary dean that they believe that if they just teach the truth that will take care of the issue (in spite of the many commands in Scripture for the pastor and teacher to actually refute error). A further question from me about how that worked for one particularly popular pastor who had been teaching there for years, who then went out to Camarillo, CA and started a "purpose driven church" (as per his website at the time) received no further response from him. Sigh.

They are likely too enamored with Spener's self defeating, divisive, "non-divisive" approach as explained in Spener's Pia Desideria. In fact I've been told that book is taught in Seminary as a good book. I've read some sections... and I shudder to think of young men who can't see the error in that book going out and leading a flock of God's sheep.

In lecture 26 Walther refutes the approach of those like Rick Warren and Bill Hybels and those who focus on 'contextualization' -- and this was done a hundred years before their time. (I guess there's nothing new under the sun):
http://www.lutherantheology.com/uploads/works/walther/LG/lecture-26.html

Anyway, good reading. The links there are to the online, older version, but I have the reader's edition from Concordia which is a little easier because the language has been updated. It's worth buying!